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Handy Guide to Portion Control

Many people with diabetes learn how to count carbohydrates in order to manage blood sugar, and others are asked to watch their weight. But one of the easiest ways to miscount carbs or calories is by underestimating portion sizes, so here are a few handy tips. Measure now, feel good later Using a food scale and measuring cups can save you a lot of worry. This way, you'll know that you had a half-cup of brown rice with 22 carbs and 100 calories,1 instead of "about" that much and "20-ish carbs/100-ish calories." Over the course of a day, small inaccuracies can add up....

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What you need to know about Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood glucose drops too low. The body responds to low blood glucose with warning signs that may be different in each person. Some warning signs of low blood glucose are feeling:     Weak     Shaky     Sweaty     Irritable or confused     Hungry Low blood glucose may occur if your meal or snack is delayed or missed, after vigorous physical activity, or if too much insulin is given. In a person without diabetes, the pancreas will stop producing insulin if the blood glucose level falls below...

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The Benefits of Staying Active

Exercise is good for everyone, but for people with diabetes, it can make a big difference in keeping your blood sugar level under control. Not only that, but staying active allows your cells to process insulin more efficiently, improving your overall A1C levels.   The many benefits to staying active Exercise is one of the cornerstones of managing your diabetes, because the list of benefits for people with diabetes is long. Exercise can:1 Improve insulin sensitivity for people with type 12 Decrease the glucose...

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Coming to terms with a diabetes diagnosis

You’ve just received the news: you or your child have diabetes. After the initial shock, you’ll probably experience a whole range of emotions and have a ton of questions. It’s a normal process that’s unique to everyone, and it may include the following stages: Denial. You don’t believe the diagnosis. Anger. You feel a sense of injustice, or anxiety that turns into revolt. Bargaining. You partially accept the situation, but question some aspects of it (the proposed treatment, the severity of the disease, etc.). ...

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Additional Resources

You may be surprised to learn that an entire diabetes community exists in Canada, and possibly in your area. Consider getting involved with a local association or support group. After all, who better to understand the diabetes-related issues you face than someone also affected by the condition, or a healthcare professional who has in-depth knowledge? A sense of community can improve your overall well-being, which means you may find the extra inspiration you need to stick to your eating, exercise and blood glucose testing plans. You, in turn, might even be able to inspire someone else. Lastly, don't forget...

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One Insulin Pump, Five Scenarios

Your insulin pump is a stalwart ally in everyday life, but some situations will require special attention (or a bit of ingenuity) from you; here are five examples. In the shower or bath. Most pumps are resistant to splashes, but cannot be submerged in water. You have two options: either disconnect your pump or find a safe place for it. If you choose the first option, check your blood sugar before and after the disconnection and don’t spend more than an hour without your pump. If you’d rather keep it with you, you can place it on the edge of the tub or in the soap...

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Managing diabetes for kids

A diagnosis of diabetes should not diminish your child’s quality of life. You and your child will have additional responsibilities over the years, but the added self-discipline may work in your child's favour. As a parent of an infant or toddler newly diagnosed with diabetes, your child’s diagnosis may affect you much more than it does your child. After all, your child is fully dependent upon you for all care, not just diabetes treatments. Even as your child begins walking and talking, diabetes will be a very small part of their world. Children live in the moment. The blood glucose test or injection that was...

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Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia (or “low blood sugar”) occurs when blood glucose levels fall below 4 mmol/L. At first, symptoms may be benign—irritability, mild nausea—but if the situation is not addressed, hypoglycemia can lead to fainting or even coma. Signs Symptoms caused by adrenaline secretion (adrenergic or neurogenic) These symptoms are usually the first to appear and should be considered "alarm bells": Trembling Palpitations...

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Neuropathy: A Painful Reality

Neuropathy is one of the complications of diabetes: over time, hyperglycemia ends up damaging nerves—particularly those in the lower extremities. This can then compromise the functioning of organs such as the digestive or renal system, the heart or the genitals. Recognizing the problem and diagnosing it in time The risk factors of neuropathy share much with those of diabetes: High blood glucose High triglyceride levels in the blood Excess weight Smoking Hypertension Your health care...

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