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Good reasons to open your home and heart to a pet

When you run across a pet adoption event, are you drawn in? Those cute little fur-babies are so tempting—perhaps it's time to give in.  You already know that pets offer wonderful emotional benefits, but did you know that they can provide physical benefits as well? In addition to unconditional love and companionship, a pet can be just the motivation you need to take better care of yourself or get more exercise. They can make a big difference in your stress levels and mood. And, if you're walking a dog every day, there may be social benefits as well.1,2 Doctors also suggest that having a pet can...

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Doctor speaking to female patient

How to Talk to Your Doctor

Whether you’ve been living with diabetes for years or you’re newly diagnosed, communicating with your health care team is one of the best things you can do. If you’re nervous about opening up to your doctor or pharmacist, there are some good reasons to conquer these fears. Less communication leads to measurable increases in your stress, anxiety, and possible depression. It also leads, inevitably, to less frequent and less successful diabetes management.1 Since communicating with your health care providers is proven to be good for your health, here are some guidelines for starting the conversation and keeping...

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How and Why to Get a Good Night’s Sleep

When you are getting enough sleep, you may find that you have an easier time controlling your blood sugar. You’ll be more alert during the day, have more energy, less stress, and an overall better mindset for monitoring and managing your diabetes. Consider what happens when you don’t get enough sleep . In addition to other things that may interfere with your sleep like schedule changes or stress, people with diabetes can have potential complications with sleep. Both high and low blood sugar levels can interrupt your sleep. People with type 2 diabetes who don’t get a good night’s sleep may have a harder time controlling blood...

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Preparing for pregnancy—good reasons to start today

Let's think into the future. Imagine sitting in a rocking chair playing with ten brand-new, tiny toes. That's the image you can remember every time you check your blood glucose, visit your doctor or say no to a glass of wine. And it's absolutely worth it. Not ready for parenthood yet? Here's what you can do now. There are several things you can do to prepare for pregnancy well before you're ready to conceive. Read about it—just not too much. When you understand the risks, you can take steps to reduce them, but it could be overwhelming if you dwell...

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Taking Good Care Of Your Skin

Living with diabetes means being more susceptible to dry skin. One reason is that high blood glucose causes more frequent urination, leading to dehydration. Given that hyperglycemia affects nerves and capillaries, you may also observe a decrease in sweating. The problem is that dry skin gets injured or cracked more easily, making it more vulnerable to infections that can create serious complications. Besides, if you’re falling prey to neuropathy, you may not notice the problem early enough. Various complications Dry skin and poor blood circulation can create itching...

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man sitting on a bench park looking depressed

Diabetes And Depression: Warding Off The Sword Of Damocles

Being diagnosed with diabetes means it’s suddenly time to make lifestyle changes, which can feel like a loss. It’s normal to feel destabilized and experience negative feelings at first. But even beyond that initial shock, people living with diabetes are more likely to slip into depression. Greater risk Nearly 10% of people with diabetes will experience major depression; around 30% will experience symptoms. That prevalence of depression is twice that found in populations without a chronic disease. Risk factors for depression include improper blood glucose management and...

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Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

What is it? Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common: it’s the one affecting up to 90% of people living with diabetes. It is mostly found in adults (hence its nickname, “adult diabetes”), particularly in those 40 years and older. However, with the obesity epidemic currently raging around the world, it has been occurring in younger and younger people. This type of diabetes is associated with a sedentary lifestyle, obesity and excess weight—especially in cases where there is fat accumulation in the abdomen area—but uncontrollable factors such as heredity and age play a significant role...

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Diabetes: A Primer

Glucose, or blood sugar, is an important source of energy, especially for the brain, and insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas which allows cells to use it and regulates how much of it your blood contains. Diabetes means the pancreas doesn't produce enough, or any, insulin, or that the hormone is not doing its job effectively. This causes blood sugar levels to be too high—a state known as hyperglycemia. Symptoms include: Frequent urination Fatigue or drowsiness Increased hunger and thirst Unexplained weight loss ...

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doctor speaking with young patient

Understanding type 1 diabetes

What is it? Type 1 diabetes affects 5 to 10% of people living with diabetes. You may know it as “insulin-dependent diabetes” or “juvenile diabetes.” Yes, type 1 diabetes requires insulin treatment, and yes, it occurs mostly in children and teenagers. But what many people don’t know is that it can develop at any age, and that it unfortunately cannot be prevented. Even today, the exact causes of the disease remain unknown. Genetics can play a role, and some environmental factors, such as viruses, can trigger the onset of the disease. What’s...

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