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“I do”

It’s decided—you’re getting married! Obviously, you have tons of things to think about, from the venue to the seating plan to the invitations… and there’s diabetes, too. In a dream situation, it wouldn’t be on your guest list, but you’re well aware that wedding or not, you’ll still have to count carbs and monitor your blood sugar. Even so, you can have everything running like clockwork in order to fully enjoy your big day.

Here are the ten commandments for keeping your diabetes in check (a crash in the middle of exchanging your vows would not be cool)!

  1. Thou shalt create a detailed plan. Because it will be a long, action-packed day. Talk to your doctor to set a testing schedule, diet plan and blood sugar targets. For example, your doctor might recommend a hearty breakfast followed by light snacks between meals and hors d’oeuvres at the wedding.
  2. Thou shalt plan the menu with care. Healthy options could very well delight your guests. Some ideas for you: lentil soup; green salads with citrus-oil dressing; baked fish or chicken; lean, grilled steaks; fruit and vegetable platters, kale chips… you’re spoilt for choice!
  3. Thou shalt choose a low-sugar cake. If having it made, you could opt for better quality flour, an icing with less sugar, or a version with fruit or fat-free cream cheese; the result will be equally delicious, and what’s more, you’ll be able to enjoy it without worry—as long as you limit your serving sizes, of course.
  4. Thou shalt find a place for your gear. Where will you store your blood glucose meter and glucose tablets? Men can use their suit jacket pockets, and women can use a cute little clutch. Oh, and make sure there’s a fridge handy if you need to store any insulin. As for the pump, it can be sewn into a pants waistline or stowed in a secret pocket a seamstress will have cleverly added to the dress.
  5. Thou shalt appoint a secret agent. Ask a loved one to check in with you throughout the day, carry juice around just in case you have a crash and remind you of your schedule for tests or injections. In case of emergency, this person should also have access to glucose tablets or insulin.
  6. Thou shalt monitor your alcohol intake. It’s easy to lose track of all the glasses that inexplicably find their way into your hands, but you’ll have to make an effort if you want to keep your bearings! Drink water between every alcoholic beverage, frequently check your blood sugar and be careful of sugary mixes.
  7. Thou shalt be prepared for low blood sugar. The food, the dancing and the overall excitement are all factors that could cause your blood sugar to fall. Don’t ignore the signs: if you start feeling dizzy or nauseous, for example, take a quick break and have something to get you back on track (snack, insulin injection, etc.).
  8. Thou shalt be mindful of your tests. Are you used to regularly measuring your blood sugar? Do so even more often at your wedding; better err on the side of caution.
  9. Thou shalt take deep breaths. Emotions and stress cause blood sugar to skyrocket, so try to relax, even though that’s easier said than done!
  10. Thou shalt experience pure bliss. On this very special day, it is you and your beloved, not your diabetes, who will steal the show. We wish you and your significant other the most beautiful wedding, everlasting memories, and all the happiness in the world.

References:
Canadian Diabetes Association, “Alcohol & Diabetes”: http://www.diabetes.ca/diabetes-and-you/healthy-living-resources/diet-nutrition/alcohol-diabetes. Accessed February 10, 2016.
DiabetesHealth, “Diabetes on the Big Day”: https://www.diabeteshealth.com/diabetes-on-the-big-day/. Accessed February 16, 2016.
Diabetic Living, “Planning a Wedding with Diabetes”: http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/community/success-stories/planning-wedding-diabetes. Accessed February 10, 2016.
Roche, “How To Have A Diabetes Friendly Wedding”: http://www.accu-chekdiabeteslink.com/how-to-have-a-diabetes-friendly-wedding.html. Accessed February 10, 2016.

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