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Handy Guide to Portion Control

Handy Guide to Portion Control

Many people living with diabetes learn how to count carbohydrates in order to manage their blood sugar, and others are asked to watch their weight. But one of the easiest ways to miscount carbs or calories is by underestimating portion sizes, so here are a few handy tips. Measure now, feel good later Using a food scale and measuring cups can save you a lot of worry. This way, you'll know that you had a half-cup of brown rice with 22 carbs and 100 calories1, instead of "about" that much and "20-ish carbs...

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Discussing Diabetes With Your Child

You just got your diagnosis? Or is your child growing up and starting to ask questions? In either case, you’ll eventually have to broach the topic with them. Here are a few tips to guide the discussion: Test the waters. Once the news is out, ask your child what they know about diabetes. Listen carefully, then set the record straight, correcting misconceptions if necessary (e.g., people living with diabetes are contagious or can’t eat sugar). Be concise. Briefly explain what diabetes is, how your medication works...

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Healthy Halloween Snacks

(Somewhat) Healthier Choices For Halloween

Candy, caramel apples and chocolate, oh my! At first glance, Halloween would not seem to be diabetes's best friend. Perhaps you even dread its arrival each year and have to fight your natural attraction to the sweets lining store shelves (and their magnetic power over your children). You don’t need to torture yourself like that: enjoying Halloween without going overboard is completely possible! Here are some ideas for kids, young and old.  Chocolate. Your best option is dark chocolate—it’s not too sweet and has a low glycemic index. Otherwise, go for wafer-style...

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Understanding type 1 diabetes

What is it? Known as “insulin-dependent diabetes” or “juvenile diabetes", type 1 diabetes affects 5% to 10% of people living with diabetes.  Type 1 diabetes requires immediate insulin treatment and occurs mostly in children and teenagers. What many people don’t know is that it can develop at any age and that it unfortunately cannot be prevented. Even today, the exact causes of the disease remain unknown. Genetics can play a role, and some environmental factors, such as viruses, can trigger the...

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Understanding Gestational Diabetes

What is it? Gestational diabetes (or “pregnancy diabetes”) affects between 3% and 20% of pregnant women. It generally occurs in the second or third trimester of the pregnancy and goes away on its own after childbirth. Any pregnant woman can develop it, but there are a number of risk factors such as age, ethnicity, excess weight, corticosteroid use, family history and some pre-existing conditions. What’s happening? Gestational diabetes...

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Understanding Prediabetes

What is it? Prediabetes is when a person’s blood sugar level (blood glucose) is higher than average, but not enough to diagnose them with diabetes. Almost all people living with type 2 diabetes have had prediabetes, but not all prediabetics develop type 2 diabetes. Of course, it’s not enough to hope you fall into the right category: without any intervention, prediabetes is extremely likely to evolve in the wrong direction. What’s happening? ...

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Putting your best foot forward!

In the long run, the hyperglycemia that characterizes diabetes ends up affecting the nerves (in what is known as neuropathy) and the blood vessels, especially the capillaries. This results in a loss of sensitivity and a decrease in the natural hydration of the feet, which leads to dry skin, cracks and calluses. This means that not only are you more likely to injure your feet and not realize it right away, but you heal more slowly, and your wounds are more likely to become infected. How do you prevent problems? ...

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Six secrets pour vous amuser lors de mariages (sans que vos taux s'affolent)

6 secrets to enjoying weddings (without your numbers going crazy)

If June is supposed to be wedding month, then why are all of your August weekends booked with stag and stagette dos, and nuptials from morning to night? The trend has shifted, with more Canadian weddings taking place in August than any other month.1 You've already seen advice on managing diabetes at weddings and parties, so we'll skip the obvious (eat before you go! drink water!). Instead, here are some ideas for having fun without regretting it an hour later (or the next morning). 1. Raise your Champagne glass! You don't have to skip alcohol just because you have diabetes. Just keep it in...

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Dealing With Holiday Stress

During the Holidays, everything is turned upside down: you eat at random times, you sleep too little or too much. Then there are the last-minute gifts you need to buy, the long trips you need to make… And on top of it all, you still need to manage your diabetes! First and foremost: don’t panic. Stress affects your appetite as well as your blood sugar levels, so you’ll want to manage it. Target stressors and avoid them if at all possible. For example, do your gift shopping earlier during the year or order online instead of...

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